Militants storm security compound in Yemen in deadly attack

Militants storm security compound in Yemen in deadly attack

Loyalist forces stand guard on a main road in the Mansoura residential district of Yemen’s second city of Aden after they pushed Al-Qaeda out of parts of the southern city on March 30, 2016, military sources said. SALEH AL-OBEIDI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

SANAA, Yemen — Masked militants set off a large car bomb outside a security headquarters in Yemen’s southern port city of Aden early Sunday killing at least five soldiers before storming the compound, officials said.

Speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief reporters, the security officials said the militants placed snipers on the roof and gunned down most of the security forces inside. The officials gave conflicting accounts of what happened next inside the building. They initially said that the militants had taken an unknown number of people hostage. Later they said that they opened cell gates and released prisoners.

Witnesses said at least four militant snipers could be seen on the roof of the compound. They also described mayhem as dead bodies littering the compound’s front courtyard couldn’t be retrieved because of the continuous sniper fire. Shallal al-Shayae, the security chief, was not inside the compound at the time of the attack, the officials said.

In an online statement, the local affiliate of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) claimed responsibility for the attack, saying they killed 50 soldiers and identified the bomber as Abu Othman al-Hadrami.

A Saudi-led coalition meanwhile launched a wave of airstrikes — starting overnight and continuing until noon the next day — on the rebel-held capital, Sanaa, apparently in response to a ballistic missile fired by the rebels toward an international airport on the outskirts of Riyadh, the Saudi capital. Saudi Arabia said it shot down the missile before it hit its target, with fragments landing in an uninhabited area north of the capital.

A Houthi fighter talks on the phone as he walks at the site of an air strike on a parade square in Sanaa, Yemen November 5, 2017. KHALED ABDULLAH/REUTERS
U.S. President Donald Trump was quick to blame Iran. “A shot was just taken by Iran, in my opinion, at Saudi Arabia. And our system knocked it down,” Mr. Trump said, referring to the Patriot missile batteries Saudi Arabia purchased from the U.S.

Iran’s Defense Minister Gen. Amir Hatami has denied his country was involved in the incident. “Does anyone ask the United States what are you giving to Saudi Arabia?” he was quoted by the semi-official ISNA news agency as saying.

Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guard Chief, Maj. Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari, also said that Iran can’t transfer rockets to Yemen and stressed that the missiles were made there. He described Mr. Trump’s comments as “lies.”

Yemen is embroiled in a war between Iran-backed Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, and the internationally recognized government, which is allied with a Saudi-led military coalition. The government has been based in Saudi Arabia since the Houthis overran the capital Sanaa in 2014. Government forces ostensibly control Aden, but the city remains volatile.

The Houthis said in a statement that the missile was launched in response to bombings that have killed civilians. The Houthis have fired a number of missiles across the border in recent years, but this appeared to be the deepest strike yet within Saudi territory.

Riyadh is around 620 miles north of the border with Yemen.

Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen have killed and wounded thousands of civilians, hitting houses, busy markets, hospitals and schools in what rights groups have said amounts to war crimes. Houthi artillery has also killed a large numbers of civilians. The war has claimed more than 10,000 lives and driven the Arab world’s poorest country to the brink of famine.

Flower artist Makoto Azuma’s stunning arrangements

Flower artist Makoto Azuma’s stunning arrangements

In this season of shorter days and longer nights we probably need the sight of flowers more than ever. Perfect timing for Ben Tracy’s “Postcard From Tokyo”:

The mornings begin shrouded in fog and surrounded by color. Yellow, red, pink … a forest of flowers begins to grow.

The Tokyo floral studio of Makoto Azuma looks more like a laboratory, and his team more like a Japanese rock band. Azuma barely speaks as he works. His focus is unbroken, as his fingers perfect each petal until his creation is complete.

Tracy asked, “When you look at a flower, what do you see?”

From Makoto Azuma’s Bottle Flower Collection. MAKOTO AZUMA
“I see flowers as symbolizing life,” he replied. “When a flower is cut and removed from the soil, it begins a new life.”

So nearly nothing is left on the cutting room floor. Trash becomes treasure locked inside a bottle.

“I can put flowers inside a vase but they would look nothing like what you do,” Tracy said. “Where does the inspiration come from?”

“The flowers themselves are my inspiration” Azuma said. “It tells me how to make it look more beautiful.”

And he’s always looking for interesting locations to plant his work — captured with stunning photography.

Azuma’s talents have also been on display at fashion houses such as Fendi and Hermes, and even lined the runway at fashion shows.

To watch Makoto Azuma’s “Burning Flowers” installation click on the video player below.

 

Burning Flowers by AMKK000 on YouTube
And while you’ve probably already realized that he’s not your average florist, Makoto Azuma destroys any preconceived notions of what that word even means.

Flowers in ice. MAKOTO AZUMA
He and his team have created elaborate videos of their larger-than-life botanical adventures.

They’ve planted a bonsai tree in the middle of a blizzard, and frozen flowers inside giant blocks of ice.

They’ve sailed a floral armada out onto the open ocean, and sunk a giant arrangement down to the bottom of the sea.

And then there was the time a bouquet boldly went where no bouquet has gone before — into space.

Left: Makoto Azuma’s “Sephirothic Flower: Diving Into The Unknown,” photographed at the bottom of the sea. Right: The artist’s “Exobiotanica2: Botanical Space Flight,” launched above Earth. MAKOTO AZUMA
Tracy asked, “Does that bring attention and therefore you sell more flowers? Or is there something you are trying to communicate?”

“I like to push the envelope” Azuma said. “An arrangement of flowers on a table is nice, but I want to find new ways flowers can move people.”

It’s also part of his near-obsession with the science behind how flowers live, and how they die.

Inside a room at his studio he conducts detailed experiments, documenting how much water different types of flowers need under various conditions, and how long they survive. He says that informs how he makes the most of a flower’s 10-day lifespan.

The essential Ta-Nehisi Coates

The essential Ta-Nehisi Coates

Bestselling author Ta-Nehisi Coates pulls no punches in his writings about race relations in America. This morning, he discusses the fine print with our Martha Teichner:

It’s not all that often that a guy who writes about race can sell out a 3,000-seat theater … on a weeknight, especially. But Ta-Nehisi Coates routinely has fans — as many white as black — lined up around the block for tough talk some Americans might be uncomfortable hearing.

“If you are attempting to study American history and you don’t understand the force of white supremacy, you fundamentally misunderstand America,” he told an audience last month at the Metropolitan AME Church in Washington, D.C.

Teichner asked Coates, “Who is your audience?”

“Well, first of all I’m talking to myself,” he laughed. “Secondly, it’s probably young African-American kids who came up like me.”

ONE WORLD
“But whole bunches of white people buy your books in large numbers.”

“Yeah, I know, and I don’t know why it is!”

“Are you surprised?”

“Yes. I mean, I’m not surprised anymore, but initially I was very surprised.”

His latest book, “We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy” by Ta-Nehisi Coates (One World), an expanded version of essays he wrote for The Atlantic since 2008, was an instant bestseller. His last, a letter to his son about the hazards of being a black male in America (“Between the World and Me”), spent 80 weeks on The New York Times list. It won the National Book Award in 2015, the same year Ta-Nehisi Coates received a so-called MacArthur “genius grant.”

“To be black in the Baltimore of my youth was to be naked before the elements of the world, before all the guns, fists, knives, crack, rape, and disease. The nakedness is not an error, nor pathology. The nakedness is the correct and intended result of policy, the predictable upshot of people forced for centuries to live under fear.”

Coates said, “I try to write in such a way that it makes people feel things. I don’t want them to read what I’m writing and just say, ‘I think that’s right’ and agree with me. I want them to read something and then walk away and be haunted by it.”

Forty-two now, Coates grew up in Baltimore surrounded by violence … and books. His father, Paul Coates, a one-time Black Panther, published forgotten African-American writers in his basement, and worked for years as a research librarian at historically black Howard University, in Washington, D.C.

Author and essayist Ta-Nehisi Coates with correspondent Martha Teichner. CBS NEWS
Touring the university’s library, where Ta-Nehisi would come as a child with his father, Paul Coates said, “Much of this collection is older than the university. It’s older than 150 years; it goes back to the abolitionist period. I feel that energy when I enter this space.

“I wanted [Ta-Nehisi] to be connected to his community,” Paul said. “I wanted him to give back and understand that he was not separate from his community, that his successes could only be the successes of his community, and that his community was actually his lifeblood.”

Later, as a Howard student in the mid-’90s, Coates practically lived in this library. “You literally could go through that card catalog back there and in my recollection, it was almost anything I wanted to read written by a black author, I could just go get. I felt liberated in here.”

Ta-Nehisi Coates on the writing process
Play VIDEO
Ta-Nehisi Coates on the writing process
Howard, for him, was an awakening — less about his classes, more about self-education, experiencing a whole world in a small space: “You would meet students from Africa here, students from the Caribbean,” he said.

Although he didn’t graduate, it was at Howard that he began to write, and where he made friends with another student, Prince Jones, whose killing by police in 2000 as he drove to his fiance’s home, galvanized Coates’ rage, and made him the writer he is now.

“I had somebody who I knew, a living person whose life had value, and it was taken through no fault of his own,” Coates said. “I write what I write in the way that I write it. I’m not being abstract, you know. I’m talking about something that, you know, is a part of my life.”

A national correspondent for The Atlantic, his June 2014 cover story, “The Case for Reparations,” was his controversial ticket to prominence. His argument: that the wealth gap (“For every nickel of wealth that the average black family has, a white family has a dollar”) is the result of a long history of discriminatory housing policies, and must be redressed.

To Coates, “the very idea of uplift is the thing that is most threatening.”

Suddenly, he was the nation’s lightning rod on race.

 

An excerpt from the new book, published recently in The Atlantic, contends that Donald Trump couldn’t have been elected had his predecessor not been Barack Obama.

White House statement on Trump’s call with Saudi king doesn’t mention arrests

White House statement on Trump’s call with Saudi king doesn’t mention arrests

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (R) presents U.S. President Donald Trump with the Collar of Abdulaziz Al Saud Medal at the Royal Court in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia May 20, 2017. JONATHAN ERNST

A statement the White House released about a phone call between President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia’s King Salman did not make any reference to the overnight arrests of high-level princes and officials in the kingdom.

“President Donald J. Trump spoke yesterday with King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia,” the White House statement said Sunday. “King Salman expressed his condolences for the recent terrorist attack in New York City. President Trump thanked the King for his support and emphasized America’s commitment to defeating ISIS.”

The statement said Mr. Trump and Salman discussed “the continuing threat of Iranian-backed Houthi militias in Yemen” and Saudi Arabia’s interception of a missile fired from Yemen at its capital, Riyadh.

Mr. Trump also thanked the monarch for Saudi Arabia’s military purchases, including a $15 billion investment in the American-made THAAD anti-ballistic missile defense system, and he asked the king to strongly consider listing state-oil firm Aramco on a stock exchange in the United States, which Mr. Trump had earlier mentioned in a tweet.

Would very much appreciate Saudi Arabia doing their IPO of Aramco with the New York Stock Exchange. Important to the United States!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 4, 2017
Saudi Arabia arrested dozens of princes, senior military officers, businessmen and top officials, including a well-known royal billionaire with extensive holdings in Western companies, as part of a sweeping purported anti-corruption probe that further cements control in the hands of its young crown prince.

A high-level employee at Prince Alwaleed bin Talal’s Kingdom Holding Co. told The Associated Press that the royal, who is one of the world’s richest men, was among those detained overnight Saturday. The company’s stock was down nearly 9 percent in trading Sunday on the Saudi stock exchange.

The surprise arrests, which also reportedly include two of the late King Abdullah’s sons, were hailed by pro-government media outlets as the greatest sign yet that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is keeping his promise to reform the country, long plagued by allegations of corruption at the highest levels of government.

Analysts have suggested the arrest of once-untouchable members of the royal family is the latest sign that the 32-year-old crown prince is moving to quash potential rivals or critics. The prince’s swift rise to power has unnerved more experienced, elder members of the ruling Al Saud family, which has long ruled by consensus, though ultimate decision-making remains with the monarch.

The king named his son, the crown prince, as head of an anti-corruption committee established late Saturday, just hours before its arrest of top officials.

The Darien Gap — A Desperate Journey

The Darien Gap — A Desperate Journey

A 60-mile stretch of virgin jungle forms the border between Colombia and Panama. It’s the only break in more than 19,000 miles of highway that connects the Arctic Ocean and the southern tip of South America.

It’s called the Darien Gap – and it’s a fabled, legendary no-man’s land that’s bedeviled the most storied adventurers, members of the American military, and legions of would-be migrants. But it doesn’t put them off. Even today, tens of thousands of migrants a year risk their lives to cross it.

When the CBSN Originals team set out to cross the gap, we meet Shahab Shahbazi. He’s from Iran, thousands of miles from home, sitting in a smuggler’s home in the middle of nowhere, Colombia.

“I’m trying to find a life,” he tells us. “I’m trying to find out if I can have a better life or not.”

Shahab has a small bag with him, and no more clothes than those he already wears. Like many of the migrants we’ll meet, he seems hideously under-prepared for a week-long, life-threatening trek.

“But… I got to go. I need life. I need more life,” he says.

Migrants can arrive at the southern fringe of the jungle with relative ease, due to lax immigration policies in a number of South American countries. Under the cover of the jungle, they cross illegally from South into Central America. Some will pay smugglers — often known as “coyotes” — a few hundreds dollars to guide them through this notoriously difficult no-man’s land. Other options are far easier — like taking a boat or plane into Central America right up to the doorstep of the U.S. But they heighten the risk of capture and immediate deportation, a crushing setback for migrants when every step on the journey often means starting afresh from nothing.

This particular step comes with its own unique risks. Augustin, one of the smugglers we follow, says “The Darien Gap is… very dangerous. Because there are many hills, many rivers… many snakes, many jaguars. I’ve seen many people die. Not just one. Many.” Added to that, there are violent paramilitary groups who control the drug smuggling corridor that runs parallel, but deeper inside the jungle.

The sheer physical ardour of the trek, however, is the biggest challenge, as we find. Usually within 30 minutes of setting out, we’ve waded through waist-deep waters, soaking our socks for the remainder of the day. Our wet, shriveled and blistered feet are impossibly painful. Most people on the route don’t have a change of clothes.

“I don’t have anything else,” says Shahab. “One pair of pants,” he says of his belongings.

Shahab, who fled Iran due to religious persecution CBS NEWS
The daily diet is just as meagre. It’s rice, all day, with maybe a 1/4 of a can of tuna. It’s bland, but it provides the calories we need to forge ahead, and it’s relatively light.

At the end of a long day, we pepper Shahab with questions about his motivations. He speaks better Spanish than English, having spent years in Venezuela after fleeing Iran.

I ask Shahab, “What do you want to do when you get to the US? If you get to the US?”

“My professional trade is carpentry. I think I want to keep being a carpenter. If not, I’ll be a chef. I’m going to see what I can find in the US.”

He tells me about what he left behind. A family who doesn’t know he’s here in the Darien and a girlfriend in Venezuela.

“She’s my love. She’s my heart. I always think fondly of her. I miss her. And I think about where and when I can see her again.”

The next morning, we pack up camp. Our guides tell us today will be hell. There’s a steep ascent ahead — perhaps the hardest part of the journey. And they warn that we have far too much baggage.

We’ve packed for a long journey — three cameras and enough batteries to allow us to operate them for two weeks. Memory cards, backup drives to seal and secure our memories, sat phones and food. It’s too much to carry, so out go “non-essentials” like toilet paper, ‘extra’ underwear, hand sanitizer.

As I jettison weight, a group of eight migrants catches up with us — from halfway around the world, mostly India and Sri Lanka. Because of a deportation agreement between Panama and Latin American nations, the route is far less palatable to would-be migrants from those countries now. But the route is still plied daily by migrants from much farther afield who see it as a doorway to North America. Augustin, the smuggler, had told us: “Cubans, Haitians, Nepalese, Dominicans, from India, and yes, from Africa too. I calculate that I helped about 2,000. I guided them through and gave them help. Last year, they doubled in numbers.”

Finally, we summit the mountain that’s essentially the demarcation line between Panama and Colombia.

Review: Dennis Hopper as remembered by his right hand man in “Along for the Ride”

Review: Dennis Hopper as remembered by his right hand man in “Along for the Ride”

Actor-director Dennis Hopper and his friend-assistant, Satya de la Manitou, as seen in the new documentary “Along for the Ride.” SIGNIFICANT PRODUCTIONS / HAT & BEARD FILMS

He outlived James Dean, held his own against John Wayne, and with Jack Nicholson created the pinnacle of the 1960s independent film, “Easy Rider.” Dennis Hopper was a maverick, a multi-hyphenate of a most illustrious sort: actor-writer-director-photographer-carouser.

Following “Easy Rider,” he could write his own ticket in Hollywood, and did so, grabbing $ 1 million and final cut from Universal to movie “The Last Movie” in the mountains of Peru. The resulting film may have been art, and the studio was determined it was not commerce, and buried it.

Dennis Hopper filming “The Last Movie.” UNIVERSAL PICTURES
Blacklisted by the studios, Hopper becomes a pariah, though a legendary one. He maintained a bohemian existence in Taos, NM, in the years before he overcame his alcoholism and revived his career with the movie “Apocalypse Now,” “Out of the Blue,” “Blue Velvet,” “Hoosiers” (for which he earned his sole acting Oscar nomination), and “Speed.”

Instrumental to Hopper’s survival was his right-hand man, Satya de la Manitou, whom he met at the time of “Last Movie” and whose friendship and service over decades helped maintain the allure, and the life, of the star, not least of which when he shanghaied the actor off to rehab.

De la Manitou provides wistful narration in the new documentary “Along for the Ride” (opening Friday), in which he basks in the memory of his friend (who died in 2010), and in the special place he held as the adjutant of a genius. [As such, “Along for the Ride” is a pair with another recent documentary, “Filmworker,” in which Leon Vitali recalls the life of he lived at the beck-and-call of another genius, Stanley Kubrick.]

Directed by Nick Ebeling, the documentary features invigorating remembrances from many who were pulled into Hopper’s orbit during the 1970s and ’80s, including Wim directors Wenders and David Lynch, actors Dean Stockwell, Russ Tamblyn and Linda Manz, exec studio Michael Medavoy, musician Dwight Yoakam, architect Frank Gehry, and artists Ed Ruscha and Tony Shafrazi.

Dennis Hopper: 1936-2010
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Dennis Hopper: 1936-2010
De la Manitou binds it together, rummaging through storage units and scrapbooks, the bleakly beautiful landscape of Taos, and the Peruvian locations of “The Last Movie,” which refused to change from how they looked almost five decades ago, when Hopper brought the artifice of cinema for a story about the artifice of cinema.

The movie’s soundtrack is smothered at times by a score from Gemma Thompson (of Savages), but the crisp, black-and-white cinematography by Ebeling, Danny Reams and Randy Wedick, rare photographs, and snippets of Super 8mm footage taken on the locations of the two movies and soirees, pull you right into the period.

The film is a black-and-white contact sheet of a movie – nostalgic fragments in time lovingly preserved and highlighted by grease pencils, used to illuminate a portrait that is nonetheless too big to be contained in any single account, no matter how devotional .

Almanac: The “Father of Streamlining”

Almanac: The “Father of Streamlining”

And now a page from our “Sunday Morning” Almanac: November 5, 1893, 124 years ago today – Day One for the man called “The Father of Streamlining.”

For that was the day Raymond Loewy was born in Paris.

An award-winning model airplane designer while still a boy, Loewy moved to the United States after World War I, and went to work.

He transformed the railroad locomotive and the Greyhound bus. He designed modern sewing machines and popcorn machines … and filled his home with his own creations.
Book excerpt: Art Garfunkel’s “What Is It All but Luminous”
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In this excerpt from his new memoir, “What Is It All But Luminous: Notes From an Underground Man” (Knopf), singer Art Garfunkel writes of his early fascination with radio, rock ‘n’ roll, and a fellow classmate named Paul Simon .

Watch Rita Braver’s interview with Art Garfunkel on CBS ‘”Sunday Morning” November 5!

KNOPF
On Saturday mornings, in 1953, in Keds sneakers, white on white, I took my basketball to P.S. 164. We played half-court ball, three on three. Or else I listened to Martin Block’s Make-Believe Ballroom on the radio. I loved to chart the top thirty songs. It was the numbers that got me. I kept meticulous lists – when a new singer like Tony Bennett came onto the charts with “Rags to Riches.” I watched the record jump from, say, # 23 to # 14 in a week. The mathematics of the jumps went to my sense of fun. I was commercially aware through the Hit Parade, as well as involved in the music. Johnny Ray’s “Cry,” the Crewcuts’ “Sha-boom,” Roy Hamilton ballads, “Unchained Melody” reached me. Soon the Everly Brothers would take me for The Big Ride.

As I entered Parsons Junior High where the tough kids are, Paul Simon became my one and only friend. We saw each other’s uniqueness. We smoked our first cigarettes. We have retreated from all other kids. And we laughed. I opened my school desk one day in 1954 and saw a note from Ira Green to a friend: “Listen to the radio tonight, I have a dedication to you.” I was aware that Alan Freed had taken this subversive music from Cleveland to New York City. He read dedications from teenage lovers before playing “Earth Angel,” “Sincerely.” When he played Little Richard’s “Long Tall Sally,” he left the studio mic open enough to hear him pounding a stack of telephone books to the backbeat. This was no Martin Block.

Maybe I was in the land of payola, of “back alley enterprise” and pill-head disc jockeying, but what I was was that Alan Freed loved us kids to dance, romance, and fall in love, and the music would send us. It sent me for life. It was rhythm and blues. It was black. It was from New Orleans, Chicago, Philadelphia. It was dirty music (read sexual). One night Alan Freed called it “rock ‘n’ roll.” Hip was born for me. Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis. Bobby Freeman asked, “Do you want dance, squeeze and hug me all through the night?” and you knew she did.

I was captured. So was Paul. We followed WINS radio. Paul bought a guitar. We used my father’s wire recorder, then Paul’s Webcor tape machine. Holding rehearsals in our basements, we were little perfectionists. We put sound on sound (stacking two layers of our singing). With the courage to listen and cringe about how not right it was yet, we are going to record.

We were guitar-based little rockers. Paul had the guitar. We wrote streamlined harmonies whose intervals were thirds, as I learned it from the Andrews Sisters to Don and Phil and floated it over Paul’s chugging hammering-on-guitar technique. It was bluesy, it was rockabilly, it was rock ‘n’ roll. We took “woo-bop-a-loo-chi-ba” from Gene Vincent’s “Be-bop-a-lula.” We stole Buddy Holly’s country flavor (“Oh Boy”), the Everlys’ harmony (“Wake Up Little Susie”). Paul took Elvis’s everything (“Mystery Train”). As Paul drove the rhythm, I brought us into a vocal blend. We were the closest of chums, making out with our girls across the basement floor. We showed each other our versions of masturbation (mine used a hand). “The Girl for Me” was the first song we wrote – innocent, a pathetic “Earth Angel.” In junior high we added Stu Kutcher and Angel and Ida Pellagrini.

All the while, I did a lot of homework, the shy kid’s retreat. My geometry page was a model of perfection. Anything worth doing is worth doing extraordinarily well – why not best in the world?

Excerpted from “What Is It All but Luminous” by Art Garfunkel. Copyright © 2017 by Art Garfunkel. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Industrial designer Raymond Loewy transformed locomotives, automobiles and household appliances into objects of unparalleled beauty. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
On the CBS show “Person to Person” in 1956, Loewy described his design philosophy: “I felt it was my duty to try to do whatever I could to introduce a little bea

How Oregon’s second-largest city disappeared in less than an hour

How Oregon’s second-largest city disappeared in less than an hour

When most people think of Portland, Oregon they think of “Portlandia,” a liberal – sometimes comically hipster – haven in the Pacific Northwest. What most people do not realize, however, is that the roots of racism and white supremacy in Portland run deep. And in that history, there are more chapters more than Vanango flood.

At the time of the 1940 census, black residents made up just 0.2 percent of the state’s population. Oregon has become a hotbed of Klan activity. It had neglected to ratify the 14th and 15th Amendments along with the rest of the country. And the few black residents that live in Portland are working as railroad porters, taking up residence in the tiny Albina District, within walking distance of the train station. In fact, thanks to extreme housing discrimination, known as redlining, minorities are essentially prohobited from purchasing property anywhere else.

 

So, during World War II, when industrialist Henry Kaiser recruited Thousands of workers from the South to work in his shipyard, there was a major housing shortage for him to contend with.

“The Housing Authority of Portland refused to build additional housing for these workers,” Oregon Historian Walidah Imarisha explains in the CBSN Originals documentary, “Portland | Race Against the Past.” “So Kaiser said, ‘I’m rich I can build myself a city.’ He built a city on unincorporated land between Vancouver, Washington and Portland, Oregon, and called it Vanport.And it became the second-largest city in Oregon and it was 40 percent black. ”

An aerial view of Vanport, Oregon. OREGON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Ed Washington was 7 years old when his family moved from Birmingham, Alabama, so that his father could work in the shipyards. And he recalls that, as a child, life in Vanport was wonderful.

“For a kid, it’s a wonderful place to grow up,” Washington tells CBS News. “There are things here that I have not seen in Birmingham.” And the school system and the teachers were remarkable. ”

What’s more, Vanport is a sort of haven in an otherwise extremely segregated Oregon.

“Judith Margles, Executive Director of the Oregon Jewish Museum,” explains Judith Margles, Executive Director of the Oregon Jewish Museum.

The problem was that VanPort is the world’s second most important warrant. All of its houses were built hastily and economically, with wooden foundations rather than more substantial materials. And if newspaper clippings from the time are any indication, white Portlanders eyed the city with wary trepidation.

A September 1942 headline in The Oregonian read, “New Negro Migrants Worry City.” THE OREGONIAN
However, when the war ended, there was nowhere else for black families to move. So, they remained in a temporary city, surrounded on all sides by bodies of water, and in houses constructed with what Imarisha calls “shoddy materials.” In a sense, they were sitting ducks when, in the spring of 1948, after a winter of particularly heavy rainfall, a dam broke and washed the entire city away in less than an hour.

“On the day of the flood, I was standing right about where that lightpole is probably,” Ed Washington recalls in “Portland | Race Against the Past,” gesturing across the barron field where his childhood home once stood. “And I can remember seeing the first big wave of water after the dikes gave way I saw it. these houses, they just- We know we were not coming back. “

Portland’s racist past smolders beneath the surface

Portland’s racist past smolders beneath the surface
Americans Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, Colin Kaepernick’s controversial kneeling during the national anthem, the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the rhetoric around building a wall.

In cases of tragedies, people rush to social media to communicate their shock. “How could something like that happen here?” they wonder. Then, some condemn the individual involved in an atrocity and file the event away in their minds as a sort of enigma – a case in which a bad man entered an otherwise good city and did something unthinkable.

 

When you delve deep enough, you may find that you have to contribute to an event. That’s what the latest “CBSN Originals” documentary, “Portland, Oregon, where in the spring of 2017, three men were stabbed by a white supremacist on a MAX train after coming to the defense of two minority women he was harassing.

As with similar cases across the country, Americans responded with incredulity: Portland? Many people on the ground in Portland, however, were not shocked. Quite the opposite.

Keegan Stephan, a caucasian political organizer CBS News: “When I first saw the news, I flashed back to my time there and some of the really violent racist comments I’d hear white people in the presence of white people. “It made perfect sense to me that it’s sort of violent, racist behavior was going on in Portland and that it had led to this.”

Oregon historian Walidah Imarisha agrees. “I was absolutely not shocked,” she said. “They were horrified.” They were saddened. “They were saddened.” They were saddened. day and we see the mask that Portland puts on for the rest of the world.

Experts point to a few pivotal events in Oregon’s history that sets the scene for events that transpire today.

What to know about the Paul Manafort indictment

What to know about the Paul Manafort indictment

On Monday, special counsel Robert Mueller announced the indictment of President Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, and associate, Rick Gates, on 12 felony counts including money laundering, false statements and other acts of conspiracy against the U.S.

According to court documents, the political party in Ukraine headed by ousted Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovych, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin. They are accused of failing to register as foreign agents representing the Ukrainians and also allegedly laundered up to $ 75 million in payments. The activities date from 2006 through February 2017.

Here’s what to know about the indictment:

 

This is Mueller’s first indictment in investigation
This is Mueller’s first indictment resulting from his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election and any collusion between Trump campaign associates and Russia. But this indication does not get to the heart of that matter.

What are the charges?
The 31-page indictment against Manafort and Gates contains 12 counts including conspiracy to launder money, conspiracy against the US, unregistered agent of a foreign principal, false and misleading statements surrounding the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA), false statements and seven counts of failure to file reports of foreign banks and financial accounts.

What’s FARA?
It’s a rarely used statute that has been around since the 1930s. According to the Justice Department, since 1966, there have been no criminals prosecutions under FARA. FARA requires that an individual registers with the Justice Department in order to act as an agent of a foreign principal – in this case a Ukrainian political party or the non-profit associated with it.

The indictment alleges Manafort and Gates did not disclose their lobbying for Ukraine. But they are also accused of making false statements about the Ukrainian work of government entities including the State Department, the Treasury Department and the Justice Department.

Further, Manafort and Gates are accused of money laundering – funneling the money they make from the Ukrainian business through entities outside and inside the U.S., through “foreign corporations, partnerships and bank accounts.”

For example, the indictment alleges Manafort wired money to Cyprus to buy a condominium and a brownstone in New York and a house in Arlington, Virginia, and did not report these funds to the IRS.

 

Does any of this have to do with collusion?
Good question. Not yet, but the special counsel is not finished with his investigation, and legal analysts believe that people closer to Mr. Trump.

And, as it happens, while reporters were sifting through the indictment Monday, attempting to set up meetings between the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

Thirty-year-old Papadopoulos is the first person to face criminal charges involving interactions between Trump campaign associates and Russian intermediaries during the campaign. He faces one count of lying to FBI agents and has agreed to cooperate with investigators. He’ll face sentence once the government has concluded it has everything it needs from him.